Originally Project Pigeon but later renamed Project Orcon (for “organic control”) was another stage in the early development of surveillance pigeons.

During WWII it was discovered that pigeons had a natural ability to track and identify. Thanks to an American behaviourist, B.F.Skinner, pigeons were recruited to control a guided missile. Long before radar and electronic guidance systems, pigeons were the pilots in the hot seat.

Another victim of war.

Little did they know this paved the way for something much more sinister.

But how did pigeons guide the missiles?

Their natural sense for identification was used to train them in recognising a target. The pigeon was then harnessed in front of a screen with a projected image. The screen was mounted on pivots so that it would move in relation to the nose of the missile. Any deviation of the missiles path from the intended target would move the image on the screen. The pigeon would peck at the target, controlling sensors that guided the missile back on path.

Boom.

Obviously technology has come a long way since WWII. Satellite and radar controlled systems have replaced the need for pigeon guided missiles. But the pigeons natural ability to track and identify has been developed in other ways. Loaded with surveillance kit, their natural abilities are harnessed for collecting private data from the public. Once a pigeon drone has you in its sight, the camera and recording equipment does its thing.

The decades of human control over pigeons is far from over as technology improves and private data increases in value.

Project Orcon is still a threat.

Pigeons Aren’t Real

 

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Originally Project Pigeon but later renamed Project Orcon (for “organic control”) was another stage in the early development of surveillance pigeons. During WWII it was discovered that pigeons had a natural ability to track and identify. Thanks to an American behaviourist, B.F.Skinner, pigeons were recruited to control a guided missile. Long before radar and electronic guidance systems, pigeons were the pilots in the hot seat. Another victim of war. Little did they know this paved the way for something much more sinister. But how did pigeons guide the missiles? Their natural sense for identification was used to train them in recognising a target. The pigeon was then harnessed in front of a screen with a projected image. The screen was mounted on pivots so that it would move in relation to the nose of the missile. Any deviation of the missiles path from the intended target would move the image on the screen. The pigeon would peck at the target, controlling sensors that guided the missile back on path. Boom. Obviously technology has come a long way since WWII. Satellite and radar controlled systems have replaced the need for pigeon guided missiles. But the pigeons natural ability to track and identify has been developed in other ways. Loaded with surveillance kit, their natural abilities are harnessed for collecting private data from the public. Once a pigeon drone has you in its sight, the camera and recording equipment does its thing. The decades of human control over pigeons is far from over as technology improves and private data increases in value. Project Orcon is still a threat. #pigeonsarentreal

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